Clinton And Trump Clash In Tense First Presidential Debate

The first presidential debate was a tense affair between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump as they clashed over their economic and trade plans, national security and race relations in the U.S.The Republican nominee came out aggressively against Clinton, often interrupting her and talking over her, but the Democratic nominee didn't pull her punches either and had plenty of zingers ready. And as the night wore on, Trump appeared repeatedly rattled as he was pressed on his past support for the...
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Bertha Vazquez has taught earth science for more than twenty-five years.

"For many years I covered the basic standard, probably like most people in the country do."

Then one day she says she decided to throw all that out the window when she saw former Vice President Al Gore speak at the University of Miami at a screening of An Inconvenient Truth, his documentary about climate change.

"And it really ... hit me. This is 2007 and, I've got to tell you, I lost sleep," Vazquez says.

You could see the contrast in the eyes of the respective candidates' spokespersons, surrogates and family members after the first presidential debate of 2016 had wrapped.

As always, earnest efforts were made on both sides to claim victory — even insist on it — after the nationally televised clash between Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton and Republican nominee Donald Trump.

"Trump was especially strong on the issues in the first 45 minutes," said former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski on CNN.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton went head-to-head Monday night in the first presidential debate.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, live annotated the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are underlined in yellow, followed by context and fact check.

Editor's note:  This story is part of an occasional series on what area community leaders and residents are doing to balance "peace and pride" in their neighborhoods.

Scientists have seen what might be plumes of water vapor erupting out of the icy surface of Jupiter's moon Europa, suggesting that its subsurface ocean could be probed without having to drill through miles of ice.

That's according to new findings from images captured by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope that were released Monday and that will be published this week in The Astrophysical Journal.

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said Monday that he's interested in offering trade alliances and long-term land leases to China and Russia.

Duterte said he realized he'd be "crossing the Rubicon" with the U.S., his country's close ally and former colonial ruler.

Fall is officially here, marking the end of a very hot summer here in Western North Carolina and across the country.  July went into the record books as the hottest month.  Along with the scorching temperatures came floods in Louisiana, and the threat of Zika in Florida.  Extreme climate events in the Southeast that not only impacted the environment – but human health.    

Keith Woods, NPR Vice President for Diversity in News and Operations, who leads the development of National Public Radio’s vision and strategy for diversity, and writes regularly on race and the media, will give a free public talk on Dog Whistles, Diversity and Election 2016 at 7 p.m. in UNC Asheville's Humanities Lecture Hall on Thursday, October 6. This event is presented in partnership by UNC Asheville's Center for Diversity Education, the university's Department of Mass Communication, and WCQS.

On the Walls at WCQS: A selection of the Isaiah Rice Photograph Collection, titled "The Way We Were," will be on display at WCQS, starting October 7, 2016. The photos depict Asheville's African-American community from the 1950's to the 1970s. WCQS will host an an opening reception at 5 p.m. on Friday, October 7. The photos will be on display through November at WCQS, located at 73 Broadway. Visitors are welcome Monday through Friday, 9 to 5, except holidays. 

Golfing legend Arnold Palmer has died at 87.

He died Sunday evening at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Shadyside, a tertiary care hospital in Pittsburgh. NPR confirmed his death with UPMC's media relations manager, Stephanie Stanley. The United States Golf Association announced Palmer's death via Twitter.

Palmer won 62 PGA Tour events, fifth on the all-time list. He won golf's biggest titles: the Masters, the U.S. Open, the British Open. He won seven majors in all.

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Keith Woods, NPR Vice President for Diversity in News and Operations, who leads the development of National Public Radio’s vision and strategy for diversity, and writes regularly on race and the media, will give a free public talk on Dog Whistles, Diversity and Election 2016 at 7 p.m. in UNC Asheville's Humanities Lecture Hall on Thursday, October 6. This event is presented in partnership by UNC Asheville's Center for Diversity Education, the university's Department of Mass Communication, and WCQS.

On the Walls at WCQS: A selection of the Isaiah Rice Photograph Collection, titled "The Way We Were," will be on display at WCQS, starting October 7, 2016. The photos depict Asheville's African-American community from the 1950's to the 1970s. WCQS will host an an opening reception at 5 p.m. on Friday, October 7. The photos will be on display through November at WCQS, located at 73 Broadway. Visitors are welcome Monday through Friday, 9 to 5, except holidays. 

Juergen Frank

  The Asheville Symphony opens it new season Saturday evening in Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. The program is called Tchasing Tchaikovsky, an all-Tchaikovsky concert featuring a performance of his violin concerto by Jennifer Koh.

Ms Koh and Daniel Meyer, music director and conductor, joined Josh Jourdan to talk about opening night.

http://www.ashevillesymphony.org

carolinanature.com

Jeremy Loeb: By the look of the trees and plants it’s obvious that summer is coming to an end and we are quickly moving into Fall color season.. what is it about this time of year? I cant put my finger on it..but it seems like such a bittersweet time…

Alison Arnold: I totally agree.. it’s hard for me to leave summer behind and yet I and I bet a few gardeners would also welcome a little cool weather. But yes it’s not really summer and not yet fall.. a definite time of transition.